VIP Services Venue Galleries Contact Corporate
09/05/2013

ANTICON RECORDS 15 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY

 

 

1015 Folsom & Anticon Records Present
ANTICON RECORDS
15 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY

 

featuring
BATHS // WHY? // JEL // D33J
DAEDELUS // DOSEONE // ALIAS
SERENGETI // ODD NOSDAM
SODAPOP // LOW LIMIT

 

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 5TH / 9P-3A / 21+

 

 

Anticon’s founders came together in early 1998 as a loose group of longtime friends and near-strangers bound by an abiding love of underground rap’s freewheeling poetics and the collage aesthetics of traditional hip-hop. They were Midwestern art school drop-outs, Northeastern would-be rap moguls, and young Californian nomads who pulled up their respective roots in order to sow the seeds of their own artist-driven movement. Anticon has since evolved from a cult-revered collective to a diverse and thriving independent label, but that momentum is still felt and the guiding principal the same: advancing the cause of good music, one release at a time.

 

The label’s original architects continue to shape Anticon, not only as some of its most innovative artists, but as curators, A&R-ing a constantly growing international cadre of music-makers to whom traditional genre lines do not apply. The creative influences of the owners are as disparate as their hometowns, and the Anticon name today stands as much for radical hip-hop as it does for pioneering electronic music, left-field rock and outsider pop. It’s this well-tended mix of breadth and focus that makes Anticon not only one of the few imprints born of the ’90s indie rap boom to weather the years, but a vibrant and viable taste-making force for many more to come.

 

VIDEOS

Baths - Lovely Bloodflow
538,507 views on YouTube


Why? - Sod In The Seed


Jel live in the Boiler Room Los Angeles


D33J Boiler Room Los Angeles LIVE Show


Daedelus - Sundown


Daedelus - Fair Weather Friends
1,009,908 views on YouTube


bathsmusic.com
Baths on Facebook

 

BATHS

For mercurial L.A. music-maker Will Wiesenfeld, Baths has been a long time coming. He has spent the better part of his days living amidst "pleasant" and "unremarkable" in the suburbs of the San Fernando Valley, so perhaps it's due to a general lack of local inspiration that Wiesenfeld's own work has never fit into a prefab box of its own. Under the handle of [Post-Foetus], Wiesenfeld has gainfully explored the intersections and outer reaches of both electronic and acoustic music. With Baths, his eclecticism finds its greatest focus yet, in a hail of lush melodies, ghostly choirs, playful instrumentation and stuttering beats.

 

Wiesenfeld's trip began at age 4, when he willed his parents into enrolling him in piano lessons. (The family upright, purchased that same year, sits in his bedroom today.) By 13, he'd begun artisting his own music using Digital Performer and a MIDI keyboard - a brief, ill-advised foray into Eurobeat that was set right when Wiesenfeld heard Bjork for the first time. Mind blown, he quickly boned up on viola, contrabass, and guitar and took the name [Post-Foetus], stringing together countless live configurations to execute his increasingly inimitable compositions. [Post-Foetus]' fourth album - a Dntel-ish, song-based melange dubbed The Fabric - was released on Mu-Nest in January.

 

Though Baths represents the next evolution in Wiesenfeld's oeuvre - which also includes the excellent ambient project Geotic - it came together under nigh-opposite circumstances. [Post-Foetus] was invited by L.A. electronicist Daedelus to share a bill with a handful of local Beat Music luminaries. Witnessing a burgeoning movement firsthand sparked something in Wiesenfeld that the 'burbs never could. In a fit of inspiration, Baths was born, though not into a preexisting scene. As is to be expected, this music goes its own way: fueled by spontaneity, tempered by Wiesenfeld's background in classic songwriting. Those two influences collide in glorious ways on Cerulean, Baths' stunning debut.

 

 


whywithaquestionmark.com
Why? on Facebook
 

WHY?

Let's get some things out of the way. WHY? is a band—three Cincinnati-bred gentlemen who've shared a whole lotta past together. Two of them are brothers. Yoni Wolf, who founded the project by his lonesome in 1998 is one of those (see also: cLOUDDEAD, Greenthink, Reaching Quiet). The other is Josiah Wolf, who first started hitting the skins at their father's synagogue during worship service. They like being in a band together so don't ask about it. WHY?'s third fella is Doug McDiarmid, a high school friend born to French teachers, discovered by the Wolfs whilst playing guitar in a Steve Miller cover band. These men are handsome and meticulous, especially when they do ugly and unwieldy things with words and music.

 

Like we said, the project started awhile ago. Really, with Yoni in the synagogue basement on a forgotten four-track, recording bad poems and sloppy beats that none of us will ever hear (again, don't ask). Flash forward through his monumental discovery of A Tribe Called Quest and his later untimely egress from art school and you'll arrive at the next most pivotal moment, when the punctuated letters W-H-Y-? graduated from an enigmatic tag loopily scrawled across various Ohio surfaces to something printed on tapes, fliers, records and CDs. As a founding member of Anticon, Yoni had one of the first releases on the label: the Split EP! with Odd Nosdam, WHY?'s half a kaleidoscopic seven-song suite of sweetly sour song-rap.

 

And then the albums began, with the cult-revered Oaklandazulasylum in 2003, documenting WHY?'s quickening march from an enticingly idiosyncratic outside-of-art, inside-the-bedroom experiment to the fiercely chopsy and wildly creative band of badasses they are today. (If you haven't heard their stuff, you should check it out. It's like pop-inflected psychedelic folk-hop, or chamber music imagined by the most lovelorn and death-anxious Beat Poet that never lived.) 2005's lauded Elephant Eyelash paved the way for tours (Silver Jews, Yo La Tengo, Islands), collabs (Danielson, Department of Eagles, Hymie’s Basement, Subtle) and more albums. Oh, and they lived in Oakland for awhile. (You remember that, don't you?)

 

Everyone comes into their own at different times. For WHY?, most agree that this happened across 2008 and 2009 with a pair of oddly engrossing stunners—the tightly rhythmic Alopecia and its quieter, kinda country cousin Eskimo Snow—which turned the oft-boxed music world on its hella gross cauliflower ear. High marks were awarded by the coolest of customers as the band momentarily swelled to five with the induction of Fog guys Andrew Broder (shred) and Mark Erickson (boom). When they finally came off of the road, WHY? set themselves to humbler tasks: turning out intimate tunes for lucky fans (via a Golden Ticket mail-order merch contest) and intricate beats for rapper Serengeti's praised Family & Friends LP.

 

 

Jel on Facebook

 

JEL

He was but a young buck, wet behind the ears and not all that wise. But if Jeffery James Logan--Catholic-born Chicago son, one-time Chuck Berry enthusiast, junior high schooler- knew one thing, he knew that he needed to play the drums. If he knew another thing, it was that he wouldn't get to, no matter how much angsty teen protest or sullen-eyed brooding he put into the cause, because, well, some jock kid was in better with the gym teacher. So Jeff-the SP-1200 beatmachine master we now know as Jel-took up the coronet. Thankfully, the SP found Jel shortly after Christmas one high school year. He'd been helping elderly women pump gas as part of a long-term scheme to turn fuel into money into circuitry into sound. He still had the tapes from the year he fell in love with music-1989 radio broadcasts from 105.9 WGCI, The Rap Down with Franky J and Disco Dave-and had been desperately searching for a way to feed his intense attraction to beat-making ever since his first urges were denied. With cash clenched tightly in young fist, he marched to the nearest music store and happily bought the cornerstone of his entire sound: the SP-1200. Revenge on a gym teacher never felt so sweet. And Jel never looked back.

 

The next few years were spent mostly in two places. When Jel wasn't locked away in his room with his new mechanical love, he was helping out behind the scenes at Northwestern University's radio station. At home he'd cut, chop, artist, and tap; on campus he'd pass his tapes along to local DJs and emcees that would stop by the station. Jel's friend and radio partner Kevin Beacham introduced him to the hip-hop that came before, the secrets of the drum machine (i.e. how to cheat to 10-second sample time), and -most importantly-a certain nasaltoned Cincinnati rapper who went by the name of Doseone. The rest of Jel's story is the beginning stages and steady fruition of an entire movement in sound. In 1996, he quit art school in favor of the chills. In 1998, his first collaborations with dose saw the light of day (Hemispheres). In January of 1999, the debut Themselves LP was finished (Them), and by Spring of the same year, work would begin on the seminal Deep Puddle Dynamics project. And from that artist-which included Jel and Doseone, Sole and Alias of Portland, Maine's Live Poets, and Slug from Atmosphere-the concept of anticon was somewhere born.

 

Today Jel lives in the Oakland Bay Area with the same SP-1200 he purchased as a teen. They left the Midwest together in a concerted effort to defy genre with a collective of like-minded individuals and instruments. His crunchy punched-out beats and swells of low-bit atmospherics have become anticon trademarks, highly sought after by artists around the globe. Jel was one of the first, if not the very first musician to use the a drum machine in live performance like a drum kit with little to no sequencing. Using the pads on the drum machine, Jel plays each snare, bass kick, cymbal and loop with his fingers. And his raps ain't half bad either. To date, Jel's list of collaborators includes Can's Malcolm Mooney, Stephanie Bohm from Ms. John Soda, Mike Patton, Wise Intelligent of Poor Righteous Teachers, Black Thought of the Roots, DJ Krush, Mr. Dibbs, Sage Francis, Atmosphere, and just about the entire anticon roster, naturally. Jel is currently a member of Themselves (with Doseone and Dax Pierson), Subtle (a cello-drumssamplers-guitar-keyboards-winds-and-words sextet on Lex artists), and 13 & God (Themselves and the Notwist). His second solo full-length is entitled Soft Money.

 

 

D33J on Facebook

 

D33J

In the hands of producer Djavan Santos, a.k.a. D33J, what should be computer-quantized or staid is given light and life. Aquatic textures overlap with bedroom clicks, muffled vocals & vacuous guitar to form hazy late night jams with just enough rhythm for a syrup-drenched dancefloor. Colors change over the course of a song — cool blues melt to hearthy reds — and melodies wind their way through shifting textures while new forms are created at every turn. Though D33J is a solo sound technician, his sound is variegated. It is lush and large and it is alive.

 

Los Angeles born and bred, D33J attended the city’s prestigious yet public Hamilton High alongside Anticon’s Baths, OFWGKTA’s Syd the Kid, the FIDLAR boys, and Friends of Friends bit-bender Groundislava. While there, he studied both guitar and electronic music, and caught friends’ shows after-hours when he wasn’t experimenting with software at home.

 

When D33J moved north to study experimental audio and visual design at the San Francisco Art Institute, he was initiated into the WEDIDIT mafia (via Shlohmo, Ryan Hemsworth, RL Grime), with whom he nurtured a strongly weirdo cult lifestyle and further developed his unique approach to crafting instrument-infused, R&B-touched bedroom techno.

 

D33J returned to L.A. to claim his rightful place among the city’s vital noise-makers. While he continues to seed the Wedidit BlogSpot with bold R3MIX3S — see clutch reinventions of Brandy, Sigur Rós, and Drake — Anticon is giving his Tide Songs EP the debut it deserves. The five tracks contained therein offer an inventive, brightly budding intro to an artist who’s only just begun to blow the eff up himself.

 

 

daedelusmusic.com
Daedelus on Facebook

 

DAEDELUS

Daedelus has dedicated his career to the war against cliché. Like his mythological namesake, Alfred Darlington is an inventor, a craftsman, a constructor of labyrinths. Others get trapped in the maze; he knows how to build wings.

 

Over the last twelve years, the LA producer has dropped two-dozen full-lengths and EPs. Each is a bespoke cut, tailored from an array of colors and textures. Pick a genre, any genre: juke, hip-hop, bossa nova, rave, classical, psychedelic, drum-and-bass, glitch, etc. If there’s a beat, Daedelus has likely freaked it. 

 

When the world strictly knew the “Low End Theory” as A Tribe Called Quest record, Daedelus helped supply the bedrock for the LA beat scene. His 2008 Live at Low End Theory remains a defining document of the most influential American club night of the last decade.

 

The record also highlights his agility and innovation as a live artist. Onstage, Daedelus transforms into a sorcerer. His shows are a glowing carnival of monomes, Victorian garb, and dance, often magnified by a mechanized backdrop of moving mirrors entitled "Archimedes," his own rendition of EDM's audio-visual spectacle. Ostensibly incompatible sounds are mixed into something novel and extraordinary. All improvisation everything.

 

Daedelus has collaborated with the likes of MF Doom, Flying Lotus, Madlib and myriad others. He's released records for beat music’s most respected imprints, including Ninja Tune, Brainfeeder, and his own Magical Properties. Despite this eclecticism, the LA Times pointed out that he “forged a singular aesthetic back when break beats and B-Boy poses still ruled the Los Angeles underground."

 

He strikes a balance between the direct and the obtuse that can’t be articulated in words. This is part of the subtext for "Drown Out," Daedelus’ most elegiac album. His debut for Anticon is a heart-on-sleeve meditation devoted to loss, coded language, and the maddening failures of communication. And yet you can still bob your head to it.

 

Consider it another invention in an always-expanding workshop. Permanent flight. No delays or clichés.